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Greenwashing: Don't Be Fooled


Greenwashing is the act of making exaggerated or false claims about the environmental benefits of a product, service, or company in order to deceive consumers and gain a competitive edge in the market. The term was first coined in the 1980s by environmental activist Jay Westerveld, and has since become a widespread issue in the world of marketing and advertising.


Greenwashing can take many different forms, from using eco-friendly buzzwords and symbols to manipulating statistics and data to misrepresenting the environmental impact of a product or service. In essence, it is a form of corporate deception that seeks to capitalise on the growing consumer demand for environmentally responsible products and services.

To spot greenwashing, it is important to be aware of the various tactics and techniques that companies use to mislead consumers.


Some common signs of greenwashing include:

Vague or ambiguous claims: A company may make broad claims about the environmental benefits of their product or service without providing specific details or evidence to back them up. For example, a company may claim that their product is "sustainable" or "eco-friendly" without explaining what specific measures they have taken to reduce their environmental impact.

Irrelevant information: Some companies may make claims that are technically true but irrelevant to the environmental impact of their product or service. For example, a company may claim that their product is "CFC-free" even though CFCs have been banned for decades.

False labels and certifications: Some companies may use labels or certifications that are either fake or meaningless. For example, a company may use a label that looks like an official government seal even though it has no legal standing.

Incomplete information: Some companies may provide only partial information about the environmental impact of their product or service in order to create a misleading impression. For example, a company may claim that their product is "biodegradable" without disclosing how long it takes to break down or what conditions are required.

Exaggerated claims: Some companies may make claims about the environmental benefits of their product or service that are simply not true. For example, a company may claim that their product is "100% sustainable" even though it is made from non-renewable resources.


To avoid falling for greenwashing, it is important to do your own research and be sceptical of claims that seem too good to be true. Here are a few tips to help you spot greenwashing:


Look for third-party certifications: There are a number of legitimate third-party certifications and labels that can help you identify products and services that are truly environmentally responsible. Look for labels like the USDA Organic seal, Energy Star certification, or the Forest Stewardship Council certification.

Read the fine print: Don't just take a company's word for it - read the fine print and look for specific details about the environmental impact of their product or service. Look for information about things like the source of the materials used, the energy efficiency of the manufacturing process, and the end-of-life disposal options.

Do your own research: If you're considering a product or service that claims to be environmentally friendly, do some research of your own to verify those claims. Look for independent studies or reports that evaluate the environmental impact of the product or service, and be sceptical of claims that aren't backed up by hard data.

Be aware of greenwashing tactics: Familiarise yourself with the common tactics that companies use to greenwash their products and services, and be on the lookout for them. If a company's claims seem vague, irrelevant, or exaggerated, there's a good chance that they're trying to mislead you.


In conclusion, greenwashing is a marketing strategy that involves making false or exaggerated claims about the environmental benefits of a product or service. It can mislead consumers into believing that a company is more environmentally friendly than it actually is, while also potentially harming the environment by promoting unsustainable practices. To avoid falling victim to greenwashing, consumers should do their research and look for independent third-party certifications or labels, as well as investigate a company's environmental practices and track record. It is also important for companies to be transparent about their environmental impact and work towards genuine sustainability rather than just using green marketing as a way to boost their image. In the long run, addressing greenwashing and promoting genuine environmental sustainability can benefit both consumers and the planet by promoting better decision-making, reducing waste, and creating a more sustainable future.






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